Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Decor’

After a stellar ten-year run,  Susan Bednar Long and Christina Sullivan Roughan,  the New York City-based power duo behind the much touted Tocar Interior Design firm, have embarked on separate paths.

As a team, the designers were known for deftly blending modern and traditional elements in every project. Their style focus is tailored, crisp and sophisticated and they never missed the mark. Here is just a sample of some of the deliciously livable spaces that the girls created together. We wish them all the best in their new ventures and look forward to seeing what comes next.

East 73rd Street Townhouse

East 73rd Street Townhouse

London Townhouse

5th Avenue Pied-a-Terre

Greenwich Village Loft

Tribeca Loft


Read Full Post »

I’m excited to report that New England Home magazine has launched a Connecticut edition and I’m so pleased to have been asked to contribute a piece for the premiere issue.

The magazine, which offers a sophisticated look at area designers, architects, products and artists,  is now expanding its focus to the exceptional design world to be found in Fairfield County.

In this era of rough seas for the publishing biz it does my heart good to see such a lovely and esteemed magazine float confidently through the flotsam.

Kudos!

Read Full Post »

Welcome to 2010 everyone!

I’m pleased to kick off a new season by posting some images from virtuoso designer Amie Weitzman.  The former Design Director for Joseph Abboud Inc. and designer for the Ralph Lauren Home Collection, Weitzman’s alchemy of earthy textures and crisp editing give all of her spaces a livable agelessness.  To punctuate that mix, she brings the same creative vision that she was known for as a fabric designer to her custom furnishings and textiles.  I am excited to be doing a story on her amazing Connecticut lake house for the March issue of Litchfield Magazine (see story here) and hope to publish a piece on another beautiful home she did in Westchester before long.

.

Read Full Post »

AlbatrossAnother Saturday morning shopping excursion on 1st Dibs. Today, the guest shopper is New York City designer, Alex Papachristidis. I picked out a collection of items that I would love to work with when putting together a fresh, sophisticated, modern living room. What pieces would you choose from this selection, how would you put them together and what would you add to bring balance to the space?

Read Full Post »

site_photo_16September again. How the hell did that happen? Still, there are some redeeming things about early autumn; cushy new sweaters, the purest deep blue afternoon skies and comfortable sleeping nights. I came across these fire features from Colombo Construction Corp a couple of months ago when I couldn’t even think about hovering over a crackling fire unless it was to toast marshmallows- now that I look at these pictures again, I kinda can’t wait for the first fireplace-worthy evening…

Elena Colombo is a classically trained sculptor and architectural designer whose works have been featured in everything from the New York Times to Country Home magazine.  Her firm, Colombo Construction Corp, is a conceptual design and fabrication firm that creates large scale exterior works.

Fire Bowls from CCC

Fire Bowls

In-ground Corten Steel Fire Arc with Acid Etched Tree

In-ground Corten Steel Fire Arc with Acid Etched Tree

Spring Burn Firebowl

Spring Burn Firebowl

Charles Doig Memorial

Charles Doig Memorial

Corten Steel Nest

Corten Steel Nest

Read Full Post »

The latest issue of Litchfield Magazine just came out, with my feature story on The Sumacs, an elegant shingle style house in Washington, CT.  (To see the entire story, click here.)

0745-02

Photos by Michael Moran

With the help of Reese Owens of Halper Owens Architects, homeowners, Gene and Barbara Kohn applied their vision and skills as architect and designer to bring this house back from the brink of blah. They were wonderful hosts and I enjoyed working on this piece. Here are some excerpts:

><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><

Built in 1894 for the illustrator and naturalist William Hamilton Gibson, The Sumacs is one of several significant “cottages” designed by renowned architect Ehrick Kensett Rossiter. Not withstanding some misguided attempts at modernization, this one hundred year-old structure was in good shape and retained most of its character-defining features. Fireplaces with glazed earthen-ware tiles, forty-eight different types of windows and elaborate turnings along the stairway are just a taste of Rossiter’s range of expression.


0745-040745-05

A meticulous renovation was undertaken with the goal of restoring many of the original elements of Rossiter’s design while bringing the 6,600 square-foot house up to date.  Formica counters in the butler’s pantry, an echo of so many remodels that sacrifice the architect’s art in the name of practicality, had to be replaced; other mid-century built-ins needed to be removed. The bathrooms and kitchen were sorely inadequate so the kitchen was gutted and doubled in size by removing a mud room and two pantries.


0745-090745-12

Several small rooms were reconfigured in keeping with Shingle Style architecture which prizes continuous volumes of space. Some of the original sleeping porches that had been closed in to create bathrooms (since there was only one installed when the house was built) were reworked. But they did keep a charmingly vintage though somewhat dubious elevator that was added not long after the house was built.

0745-180745-21A

Read Full Post »

Today, Interior Design Magazine’s Designwire Daily has a piece on two exhibitions which celebrate the 90th anniversary of a profoundly influential (and one of my favorite) design movements; the German Bauhaus school. “Bauhaus. A Conceptual Model”, is currently running at Berlin’s Martin-Gropius-Baumuseum through October 4th, and the Museum of Modern Art will be hosting, “Bauhaus 1919-1933: Workshops for Modernity”, from November 8 to January 18th. (See the entire story here.)


800px-BauhausType

Bauhaus (“House of Building” or “Building School”) was founded by Walter Gropius in 1919 and ran until 1933.  Its attempt at a “new way of living” combined crafts and the fine arts, with the idea of creating a total work in which all arts could be united;  a modern approach which reflected the social changes of the time.

Klaus Labuttis of the Dezignare Interior Design Collective (www.dezignare.com) writes: “The ‘New Man’ became the ideal, a concept that also expressed itself in living. The Bauhaus Design showed a simplicity with emphasis on straight edges and smooth, slim forms. The rooms were sparsely furnished, superfluous features were taboo. Shining steel was discovered as a material for furniture. The aim was to take advantage of the possibilities of mass production to achieve a style of design that was both functional and aesthetic. Objects were to be designed to have simplicity, multiplicity, economical use of space, material, time and money which looks as modern as anything in production today.”

◊ Bauhaus Style ◊

Furnishings:

Ludwig Mies van der Rohe Adjustable MR Chaise Lounge for Knoll.

Ludwig Mies van der Rohe Adjustable MR Chaise Lounge for Knoll at 1st Dibs

Christian Dell (by Kaiser) Desk Lamp Circa 1930 at 1st Dibs

Christian Dell (by Kaiser) Desk Lamp Circa 1930 at 1st Dibs

1924 Marianne Brandt Silver and Ebony Tea Pot at Tecnolumen

1924 Marianne Brandt Silver and Ebony Tea Pot at Tecnolumen

1924 Wilhelm Wagenfeld Nickel plated Tea Cannister

1924 Wilhelm Wagenfeld Nickel plated Tea Cannister at Tecnolumen

Architecture:

1938 Walter Gropius house, Lincoln, Massachusetts

1938 Walter Gropius house, Lincoln, Massachusetts

Barcelona Mies van der Rohe Pavillon

Barcelona Mies van der Rohe Pavillon

Art:

Komposition 8; 1923 by Vasily Kandinsky at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York

Komposition 8; 1923 by Vasily Kandinsky at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York

Bauhaus Stairway by Oskar Schlemmer;1932 at The Museum of Modern Art, New York

Bauhaus Stairway by Oskar Schlemmer;1932 at The Museum of Modern Art, New York


Read Full Post »

Older Posts »